48 hours in Killarney – Part 2

The concluding part of my Killarney travel diary. Visit part 1 to see how to spend an evening in the national park visiting Ross Castle and the Torc Waterfall.

Day Two

Our only full day so there was no time to waste. After a great breakfast at The Ross we hit the road again. I’m never going to become a food blogger but look at this breakfast!
Breakfast at The Ross Hotel
Breakfast at The Ross Hotel

The Gap of Dunloe

Today we went a little further afield starting with The Gap of Dunloe, a 11km narrow mountain pass between the MacGillycuddy Reeks and Purple mountain. And narrow it most certainly was. 
The Gap of Dunloe
View of the Gap of Dunloe from the Wishing Bridge
The Wishing Bridge, Gap of Dunloe
The Wishing Bridge
After a short stop to take in the spectacular view from the Wishing Bridge we decided to continue driving. We didn’t know what was ahead just didn’t want to go back on ourselves. Had we known we probably would have turned around! The road is very narrow, just room for one car, with many twists and turns. Luckily we were travelling early in the day so we pretty much had the road to ourselves. However, I’ll never know how my friend kept her cool driving through the narrow twists and turns.
The narrow road at The Gap of Dunloe
The narrow road at The Gap of Dunloe
The twists and turns of The Gap of Dunloe Road
The twists and turns of The Gap of Dunloe Road
Once through the pass we descended through the remote and desolate Black Valley – the last place in Ireland to be connected to the Irish National Grid. Can totally see why that took so long! Don’t expect to get much phone signal up here either – so no looking at google maps! However the peace and tranquility of the valley with only the sheep for company were well worth the nerve wracking drive.
Welcome to the Black Valley
The remote Black Valley
Sheep along The Gap of Dunloe Route
The sheep!
Ladies View Our next stop was Ladies View. You can’t deny that Queen Victoria’s ladies in waiting knew what a good scenic view was during their 1861 visit. So good they named it after them. I’ll let the photo do the talking. 
Ladies View
Ladies View
One of the best things driving around was stumbling across little places that you may have missed if you were on one of the many coach tours. We spotted a few cars parked up and decided to join them and was rewarded with this view. It’s probably a famous one I’ve forgotten the name of or something…if it is let me know in the comments below!
A nameless view over the lake
The nameless view…
Nameless view, Killarney
Another view of the nameless view!
Aghadoe Viewing Point  You’d think we’d be over spectacular views by this point but no there was room for one more. Apparently it is one of the locals favourite views and I can’t disagree. Overlooking the town, lakes and mountains this would be a great place to watch the sunset.
Aghadoe Viewpoint
View over the lake from the Aghadoe Viewpoint
 
View back over Killarney from the Aghadoe Viewpoint
View back over Killarney from the Aghadoe Viewpoint

Day Three

Our last day in Killarney. As we had a late afternoon flight there was time for a bit more sightseeing. This time a stroll around the gardens at Muckross House and a wander back to the Torc Waterfall (via a different route) to show some friends who weren’t with us on Friday night. Going back in the middle of the day was quite a contrast. Was much busier so if you plan to visit have a think about what time of the day you visit.
Muckross House
Muckross House
Muckross House Gardens
Muckross House Gardens
Downstream of the Torc Waterfall
Downstream of the Torc Waterfall
While we crammed a lot into our 48 hours in Killarney (including a gig) it never felt rushed so concentrating on the sights in the national park turned out to be the best idea. However, it’s now made me want to see much more of that part of Ireland. You could easily spend a week or two exploring. I’ll be making plans to return as soon as possible! I took a ridiculous amount of photos over the two days, too many to share here, so look out for some photo blogs over the next few days. Hopefully they’ll inspire you to add the south west of Ireland to your travel wish list. Have you visited Ireland?  I’d love to hear your recommendations in the comments below. SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave

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